Archive for April, 2013

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 4/4

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 4/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Paul Egan: A growing [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 3/4

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 3/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Karen Loxton [@LoxtonKaren]: Parasite [&hellip

Earth day

Earth day

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Monday 22nd April was Earth Day. In schools and offices all around the world people organised events to highlight the importance of the Earth and the harm that climate change, deforestation, and other human impacts are causing. As an ecologist and someone who cares about conservation I should welcome Earth Day and its relative, Earth Hour, with open arms. Shouldn’t’ I? Maybe, but I really can’t. In fact, I find these sorts of events incredibly frustrating. Implicit within them is the idea that if we spend one day really caring then we can spend the other 364½ [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 2/4

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 2/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Danielle McLaughlin: BMP signalling [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 1/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Rebecca Rolfe [@rolfera]: Identification [&hellip

Hide and seek with a T-Rex in a drawer

Hide and seek with a T-Rex in a drawer

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Natalie Cooper and Sive Finlay already posted on this blog about the amazing old stuff you can find in a Natural History Museum (here and here). Palaeo collections are also special, I spent one week in the Smithsonian Institution Paleobiology collections to measure some Eocene American primate teeth and I was amazed by the quality of their collections. But the nice thing about Palaeo collections is that when you’re looking for a particular specimen, you always come across wonders you didn’t expect.   Author Thomas Guillerme: guillert[at]tcd.ie Photo credit Thomas Guillerme, with the kind permision of Michael [&hellip

Disney Ecology

Disney Ecology

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

In light of the current stresses of exam season, I have been contemplating my parallel educational history. Of equal, if not superior, importance to any stage of my conventional academic life, I have had a Disney education. If I visit medieval castles or forts rich in feudal history I can’t help but mentally locate Rapunzel’s tower and contemplate the prince’s access route. My Greek mythological references are entirely based upon Disney’s Hercules and any mention of Rudyard Kipling is incomplete without at least one verse of the Bare Necessities. Zoological education is no exception. Early Disney films [&hellip

Finding a PhD

Finding a PhD

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Undergraduate and Masters students often come to me for advice about how to find a PhD position. I know quite a few students read this blog so I thought I’d share the advice here. Hopefully some of it is helpful! Note this is aimed at people in the UK and Irish system who often go straight from undergraduate to a PhD (or do a brief one year Masters course in between the two). But many points are relevant to the US system too. 1) First make sure you definitely want to do a PhD! This is really [&hellip

Icefish: The coolest fish on the planet

Icefish: The coolest fish on the planet

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

I love fish. Not (just) to eat, but to study and learn about and at times just marvel at their beauty. They are arguably the most diverse vertebrate group (and easily arguable if you take the cladistic view that all vertebrates are, at heart, just highly modified fish). But even focusing solely on actinopterygians (ray-finned fish) every aquatic niche is filled by one species or another, from the poles to the equator, from the high Tibetan plateau to the depths of the ocean where sunlight is a distant memory. If there’s water chances are there’s fish. My [&hellip

Top tips for science networking!

Top tips for science networking!

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Science is a business like any other, and it’s hard to get things done if you don’t know anyone outside of your own department. Other scientists will review your papers and grants, invite you to give talks and hopefully employ you in the future. So the more people you know, the easier it gets. Conference season is just around the corner so I thought I’d continue my hints and tips series by talking about networking at conferences. Step 1: Finding someone to network with… Find someone you know and get them to introduce you to everyone they [&hellip