Posts Tagged ‘museum’

Trophy Hunters

Trophy Hunters

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

It may be an inconvenient truth in these conservation-focused times but we owe a debt of gratitude to the trophy hunters; the army officers and colonial-types who killed animals for sport and prestige. Without their considerable efforts, the vaults of natural history museums would be devoid of the skeletons and skins which form the bases of both exhibitions and many PhD and MSc. theses. Of course, were it not for the over-zealous efforts of hunters perhaps many charismatic animal species wouldn’t be so endangered now but let’s focus on the positives here… Naturally, if you’re a hunter [&hellip

Night in the Research Museum

Night in the Research Museum

By EcoEvo@TCD | News

  On Friday the 27th of September, as part of the Discover Research Night we opened the doors of the department to the public. We decided that since we have a museum full of some really cool stuff, we could use it to demonstrate some of the research in the department. Since the research night had a mix of students, families and the generally curious we introduced each tour with some of the j-awesome teeth (I make no apologies for puns) to demonstrate the basics of ecology and evolution. So, with the help of Baleen, shark jaws, elephant [&hellip

Prince Tom

Prince Tom

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

  There’s an international celebrity star of the Victorian age directly above my office. He’s lived there long enough to see his museum home gradually shrink around him to such an extent that he no longer fits out the door. He will spend the rest of his days eavesdropping on undergraduate lectures, seminar presentations and NERD club meetings. Prince Tom adds a flavour of exoticism and royal blue blood to our Zoology Museum’s collections. Tom was an Indian elephant caught from the wild and presented as a gift from the ruler of Nepal to Queen Victoria’s second [&hellip

The Evolution of Natural History Museums

The Evolution of Natural History Museums

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

I’ve been touring international natural history museums as part of my PhD research. The “behind the scenes” aspect of each museum is fairly unchanging; row upon row of cabinets with some very unusual objects lurking within – the taxidermic tastes of some people just leave you wondering… Aside from the obvious dissimilarities in size, the major difference between the museums I’ve visited is in the style of their public exhibits. Like any other industry, museum exhibition styles are subject to fashion trends which reflect society’s interests and inclinations at the time of the exhibit’s creation. Visiting collections [&hellip

Hide and seek with a T-Rex in a drawer

Hide and seek with a T-Rex in a drawer

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Natalie Cooper and Sive Finlay already posted on this blog about the amazing old stuff you can find in a Natural History Museum (here and here). Palaeo collections are also special, I spent one week in the Smithsonian Institution Paleobiology collections to measure some Eocene American primate teeth and I was amazed by the quality of their collections. But the nice thing about Palaeo collections is that when you’re looking for a particular specimen, you always come across wonders you didn’t expect.   Author Thomas Guillerme: guillert[at]tcd.ie Photo credit Thomas Guillerme, with the kind permision of Michael [&hellip

Treasures of Natural History

Treasures of Natural History

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

The Natural History Museum in London is one of my favourite places. The majesty and beauty of the building’s design is a fitting exterior to house the truly stunning collections within. The new Treasures exhibition displays just 22 of the museum’s most prized possessions. It’s a special opportunity to see valued and varied treasures such as the type specimen of the earliest known bird, Archaeopteryx, Darwin’s pigeons and the Iguanodon teeth which sparked the discovery of the dinosaurs all lined up together. The stories behind the origin and significance of each of the treasures are fascinating. Although not one [&hellip

Darwin’s insects, Dodo skeletons and macaques with braces

Darwin’s insects, Dodo skeletons and macaques with braces

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

The Natural History museum in Dublin is one of my favourite places in the city. It has a very Victorian feel to it, none of this pandering to the X-box generation, just cabinet upon cabinet of mounted skins and skeletons revealing the diversity of nature. Some of the taxidermy is pretty hilarious and you can see the bullet holes in some of the skeletons, but that adds to the charm of the place! I did a lot of museum based work during my PhD and absolutely loved using museum collections, so now I have my own students they all [&hellip