Posts Tagged ‘pollinators’

Shall we kill all our bees?

Shall we kill all our bees?

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Perspectives

“Kill all the bees!!”, the modest proposal of Prof. Paul Sutton from University of South Australia is a provocative attempt to convince economic rationalists to finally start counting what really counts. If all the bees were to go extinct we will have to replace them by, for example, hand-pollinating our crops. That means employment, economic growth in terms of GDP and tax revenues: very good for the Economy. Now, the fact that not many economists will actually support this policy does not change the fact that if all the bees are going to be gone then GDP [&hellip

Seminar series highlights: Phil Stevenson

Seminar series highlights: Phil Stevenson

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Seminars

As mentioned previously on the blog, Andrew Jackson and I started a new module this year called “Research Comprehension”. The module revolves around our Evolutionary Biology and Ecology seminar series and the continuous assessment for the module is in the form of blog posts discussing these seminars. We posted a selection of these earlier in the term, but now that the students have had their final degree marks we wanted to post the blogs with the best marks. This means there are more blog posts for some seminars than for others, though we’ve avoided reposting anything we’ve posted [&hellip

Big is better!

Big is better!

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Reflections on geeking it up at Intecol 2013 by Jane Stout Having not been to a 2000+ delegate, multi-session, international conference for several years, I was a bit nervous in the run up to INTECOL2013 “Into the next 100 years: advancing ecology and making it count” – would it be possible to see all the talks, read all the posters and meet all the people I planned to? (Answer: no). Would I remember everyone and would anyone remember me from past meetings? (Answer: some yes, some no – thank goodness for name tags). Could I follow in the [&hellip

What I did this summer: Tortured some bees

What I did this summer: Tortured some bees

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

Among the multiple pressures currently driving decline in bee populations, little attention has been given to naturally occurring toxins in plant nectar.  We carried out research this summer on invasive Rhododendron ponticum, a plant that contains neurotoxins in its floral nectar.  We found this toxin to be lethal to honeybees, but apparently benign to the plant’s main pollinators, bumblebees.  Differential responses by bee species to toxins and other pressures means we need to consider bee decline on a species by species basis. It is well documented that bee populations worldwide are in trouble, and we’ve written about [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 2/4

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 2/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Danielle McLaughlin: BMP signalling [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 1/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Rebecca Rolfe [@rolfera]: Identification [&hellip

“See you later, pollinator”

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Scientific conferences can be a great way of meeting people, getting and sharing new ideas, and networking with people from, often, all over the world. And they can be good fun too! On October 25th-28th several people in the School travelled to Norway for the annual conference held by the Scandinavian Association for Pollination Ecologists (SCAPE). This meeting is held for ecologists working with pollination, plant reproductive biology and other related fields and it attracts a small but expert crowd from Scandinavia, Europe, and sometimes even further afield (this year there were attendees from Brazil and Israel!). [&hellip