Posts Tagged ‘science communication’

A recipe for collaboration

A recipe for collaboration

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Research

Recently, along with Adam Kane, Kevin Healy, Graeme Ruxton and Andrew Jackson, we published a review on scavenging behaviour in vertebrates through time in Ecography. This paper was my first review paper as well as my first paper written from afar, without ever actually meeting in a room with the co-authors for working on the project. Difficulty: * Preparation time: 5 month to submission Serves: 5 people (but any manageable number of people who you like working with will do) Ingredients: An exciting topic: For this recipe you will need an exciting topic. In this case, prior [&hellip

Research haikus

Research haikus

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

Last month, the Zoology Department’s Dr. David Kelly launched his first book of Japanese short form poetry, Hammerscale from the Thrush’s Anvil. At the launch of the book, David invited us in the audience to try our hand at writing our own haikus. Taking him up on his challenge, and taking inspiration from his book, a few of us in the School of Natural Sciences have penned our own poems based on our areas of study. We even have a contribution from David Kelly himself! Trying not to sacrifice coherency at the alter of syllable number was [&hellip

Winning research - Zoology storms the Lightening Talks

Winning research – Zoology storms the Lightening Talks

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research, Seminars

Earlier this month, postgraduate students of the Zoology department compete in the fourth annual ‘School of Natural Sciences Lightening Talks’ alongside students and staff from Botany and Geology. We all presented 120 second snapshots of our research and were judged by a panel. Judges included the Head of the School of Natural Sciences Professor Fraser Mitchell, Science Gallery’s Aine Flood and Trinity’s press officer for the Faculty of engineering, mathematics and science, Thomas Deane. Zoology had two winners on the night, Darren O’Connell (@oconned5) for his presentation on ‘Character release in the absence of a congeneric competitor’ and [&hellip

Iguana vs Snakes | Planet Earth 2

Iguana vs Snakes | Planet Earth 2

By EcoEvo@TCD | Reviews

Most of us were glued to the hugely anticipated premier of Planet Earth 2 this Sunday. We watched lovesick sloths meander through the mangroves, giant dragons battle it out on Komodo, and penguins getting fecked off cliffs by monstrous waves. But if there was one scene that got us talking more than any other it was the literal race for survival that took place between a newly hatched marine iguana and an ominous pack of southern black racer snakes. The baby iguana had us shouting at the telly and clutching our faces while we watched its mad [&hellip

Formally informal conferences

Formally informal conferences

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

  One of my favourite parts of working as a researcher during the summer (aside from quiet campuses with less students around) definitely has to be the “conference season”. Indeed, I don’t need to convince many people that conferences are one of the lively and exciting parts of doing science that rightly mix traveling, networking (and sometimes drinking) and learning about so many new things (and sometimes hangovers). One of the problems though is that they can sometimes be overwhelming. It’s hard to find a balance between the right amount of networking (how many friends/collaborators do I [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 3/3

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 3/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Aoibheann Gaughran (@Aoibh_G) Supervisor: Nicola Marples Title: How population density influences social mammal ecology: A case study of the European badger.  The local density of a population of social mammals can affect many aspects of its ecology including social structure, mating systems, dispersal behavior, territorial behavior and the dynamics of disease. Scientists and policy-makers need a comprehensive understanding of the local population density as this may dictate the most effective management strategy. The European badger provides a particularly good species to investigate the effects of population density on other density parameters because its density varies by orders of [&hellip

School of Natural Science Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 2/3

School of Natural Science Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 2/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Aoife Delaney (@Ifa_Dee) Supervisor: Jane Stout Title: Do principals of cross congruence apply in a naturally disturbed habitat? Cross congruence is a measure of the degree to which diversity (number or composition of species) of different taxa follow broadly similar patterns in response to environmental conditions. In situations where cross congruence is strong, measuring the diversity of a single taxon can provide information regarding overall diversity, and this has led to the development of indicator taxa. Indicator taxa may be used to indicate general patterns of biological diversity or environmental conditions, often with the inference that where the environmental conditions are [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3 #zoobotpgsymp, not an infection transmitted by botflies, but the hashtag of the annual Botany-Zoology postgraduate symposium, hosted by the School of Natural Sciences, which took place on the 14th of April. This year’s symposium hosted 15 student speakers over 2 sessions of talks as well as two pleniaries delivered by our guest speakers: Dr Nina Alphey (University of Oxford, Imperial College London) and Dr Rob Thomas (University of Cardiff). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts [&hellip

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the “ten hundred” most used words.

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

At today’s NERD club, we tried our hand at explain our research using the up-goer five, which limited our available vocabulary to the “ten-hundred” most common words (thousand isn’t one of them). After some brief hesitation, the 9 of us present found out that despite being quite challenging, this can be an incredibly fun and useful activity when it comes to explaining our often jargon-filled research to the public. While this system is rigid, and a tad extreme with words such as “plant” and “science” unavailable, it forced us to find alternative ways of explaining what we do.   [&hellip

Spud Oddity: Did The Martian really “science the sh*t out of this”?

Spud Oddity: Did The Martian really “science the sh*t out of this”?

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Reviews

It’s rare to come across a sci-fi movie that isn’t loaded with technobabble or scientific terms that are used ever so incorrectly. In fact, a lot of the Hollywood blockbusters are guilty of mincing the scientific words and concepts for entertainment value: “The Day After Tomorrow”, “Armageddon”, “Lucy”, “The Core”, to name but a few. In short, Science itself has been drastically misrepresented by the Hollywood industry. Then along came Ridley Scott’s sci-fi epic “The Martian”. Based on the sci-fi novel by Andy Weir, it tells the story of astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon), who’s left stranded [&hellip