Posts Tagged ‘Trinity College Dublin’

Winning research - Zoology storms the Lightening Talks

Winning research – Zoology storms the Lightening Talks

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research, Seminars

Earlier this month, postgraduate students of the Zoology department compete in the fourth annual ‘School of Natural Sciences Lightening Talks’ alongside students and staff from Botany and Geology. We all presented 120 second snapshots of our research and were judged by a panel. Judges included the Head of the School of Natural Sciences Professor Fraser Mitchell, Science Gallery’s Aine Flood and Trinity’s press officer for the Faculty of engineering, mathematics and science, Thomas Deane. Zoology had two winners on the night, Darren O’Connell (@oconned5) for his presentation on ‘Character release in the absence of a congeneric competitor’ and [&hellip

Studying worms - a Nobel calling

Studying worms – a Nobel calling

By EcoEvo@TCD | News

  “Parasites are not generally regarded as being loveable. When we refer to people as parasites we are not being complimentary, we are not praising them. We tend to think that a parasite is the sort of person who goes through a revolving door on somebody else’s push. This is unfair. It’s unfair to real parasites… It is time for parasites to get a little more respect!”                                                        – Professor William C. [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 3/3

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 3/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Aoibheann Gaughran (@Aoibh_G) Supervisor: Nicola Marples Title: How population density influences social mammal ecology: A case study of the European badger.  The local density of a population of social mammals can affect many aspects of its ecology including social structure, mating systems, dispersal behavior, territorial behavior and the dynamics of disease. Scientists and policy-makers need a comprehensive understanding of the local population density as this may dictate the most effective management strategy. The European badger provides a particularly good species to investigate the effects of population density on other density parameters because its density varies by orders of [&hellip

School of Natural Science Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 2/3

School of Natural Science Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 2/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Aoife Delaney (@Ifa_Dee) Supervisor: Jane Stout Title: Do principals of cross congruence apply in a naturally disturbed habitat? Cross congruence is a measure of the degree to which diversity (number or composition of species) of different taxa follow broadly similar patterns in response to environmental conditions. In situations where cross congruence is strong, measuring the diversity of a single taxon can provide information regarding overall diversity, and this has led to the development of indicator taxa. Indicator taxa may be used to indicate general patterns of biological diversity or environmental conditions, often with the inference that where the environmental conditions are [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3 #zoobotpgsymp, not an infection transmitted by botflies, but the hashtag of the annual Botany-Zoology postgraduate symposium, hosted by the School of Natural Sciences, which took place on the 14th of April. This year’s symposium hosted 15 student speakers over 2 sessions of talks as well as two pleniaries delivered by our guest speakers: Dr Nina Alphey (University of Oxford, Imperial College London) and Dr Rob Thomas (University of Cardiff). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts [&hellip

Room for one more?: Egg fostering in seabirds

Room for one more?: Egg fostering in seabirds

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

  When attempting to conserve a rare animal population sometimes every individual counts. Conservationists regularly go the extra mile to protect their study species. The conservation efforts implemented for the Little Tern (Sternula albifrons) in Britain and Ireland demonstrate the success these efforts can have. This species nests on shingle beaches and had experienced catastrophic population declines due to increasing development and use of beaches by people. Little Tern adults are very vulnerable to disturbance and their eggs are particularly vulnerable to walker’s boots! Thankfully a network of wardened colonies, run by a mixture of conservation organisations [&hellip

The Evolution and Laboratory of the Technician.

The Evolution and Laboratory of the Technician.

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

First in a series of posts on life after an undergraduate degree, Alison Boyce gives an account of the life of a scientific technician. Science, engineering, and computing departments in universities employ technicians. Anyone working or studying in these areas will have dealt with a technician at some point but most will be unaware of a technician’s route into the position and their full role in education and research. Technical posts are varied e.g. laboratory, workshop, computer. Funding for technical support is afforded by the Higher Education Authority (HEA) to provide assistance in undergraduate teaching. This is [&hellip

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the “ten hundred” most used words.

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

At today’s NERD club, we tried our hand at explain our research using the up-goer five, which limited our available vocabulary to the “ten-hundred” most common words (thousand isn’t one of them). After some brief hesitation, the 9 of us present found out that despite being quite challenging, this can be an incredibly fun and useful activity when it comes to explaining our often jargon-filled research to the public. While this system is rigid, and a tad extreme with words such as “plant” and “science” unavailable, it forced us to find alternative ways of explaining what we do.   [&hellip

3 years as a PhD student

3 years as a PhD student

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

I arrived in Ireland October 2012 with the purpose of undertaking a PhD supervised by Natalie Cooper on Primates evolution. Looking back, the start of the whole endeavour seemed really stressful to me (new country, new customs, new language) and the project just as frightening (what do I do?, where do I start?, will I be able to do it?)… What happened after was way below my expectations: these three years were anything but stressful and frightening! OK, even though not everything went smoothly and it had to take the best of the personalities (that are thankfully common sights in Trinity [&hellip

A Nobel Pursuit

A Nobel Pursuit

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Research

Splitting the atom, unlocking the secrets of radiation, or even leading a peaceful civil rights movement. I grew up knowing that these were the sorts of achievements that earn you a gold medal and an invitation to Sweden in mid-December. I have since learned that the annual ceremony held in honour of Alfred Nobel hasn’t always been awarded to the most deserving candidate, and that sometimes the winners simply stumbled upon a discovery that changed the world. This was not the case with the 2015 Nobel prize for Physiology and Medicine.   Scientists rarely aim for such [&hellip