Posts Tagged ‘vultures’

A recipe for collaboration

A recipe for collaboration

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Research

Recently, along with Adam Kane, Kevin Healy, Graeme Ruxton and Andrew Jackson, we published a review on scavenging behaviour in vertebrates through time in Ecography. This paper was my first review paper as well as my first paper written from afar, without ever actually meeting in a room with the co-authors for working on the project. Difficulty: * Preparation time: 5 month to submission Serves: 5 people (but any manageable number of people who you like working with will do) Ingredients: An exciting topic: For this recipe you will need an exciting topic. In this case, prior [&hellip

V for Vulture

V for Vulture

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

I have recently returned from a field trip to Swazliand where I was working with my long-time collaborator Prof Ara Monadjem to tag two African White-backed Vultures with high-spec trackers. These devices were purchased with a $20,000 grant from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund and are currently sending their locations every minute via the mobile phone network. Up to now we have no idea where the Swazi population of this species forages and this is something the tracking data will reveal. With only a few weeks of tracking data we can see the birds have already ventured into Mozambique and South Africa.   Author Adam Kane, kanead[at]tcd.ie [&hellip

Bird Feeders

Bird Feeders

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

It’s coming up to winter so people will be conscious that our garden birds need a helping hand to get through the cold months. Bird feeders will be stocked, bread served up and water dished out. In the UK alone, almost half of households provide supplementary food for birds throughout the year. And although songbirds are usually the species that come to mind when we think of provisioning food the same principle can apply to more exotic birds, notably vultures. Indeed conservationists have supplied extra food to these scavengers for decades. Instead of bread or berries, a [&hellip

Cape Vulture Conservation

Cape Vulture Conservation

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

Conservationists try their best to stop endangered species sliding to extinction and keep the habitats of these life forms intact. Captive breeding programs, national parks, management of invasives etc. are all common measures in conservancy. But how do we know that these methods work? Perhaps an invasive species is actually serving as a food source for the conservation target, and, by killing off the former, we imperil the latter further still. Fortunately, we can avoid such disasters through experimentation and modeling, in other words, with some good science. Consider the case of the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) [&hellip

How to build a vulture trap

How to build a vulture trap

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

Last month I spent a month in Mbuluzi Game Reserve in Swaziland attempting to build a walk-in trap that will allow me to capture vultures. I want to be able to tag the birds with GPS trackers and ask a host of interesting questions from which a flood of Nature papers will follow. We’ll have to wait for the vultures to get habituated to the area before adding the front to the trap. Once this happens we can proceed. So this is a ‘to be continued’… Author Adam Kane: kanead[at]tcd.ie Photo credit Adam Kane &nbsp

May I take your order?

May I take your order?

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

My PhD involves studying the foraging behaviour of vultures. So far I’ve done theoretical work and also had the luck to get some second hand empirical data. But I’d like to be able to get some field data first hand. To that end I’m setting off to Swaziland on Saturday with the intention of building a vulture restaurant and a walk-in trap. The first item takes a little explaining. Vultures are carrion feeders, which means their food source is unpredictable, the bird never knows when the next wildebeest is going to drop dead. So they’re quite sensitive [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium: Part 1/4

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

On the 15th and 16th April we had one of my favourite events at Trinity College Dublin: the annual School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium. Over the course of two days many of our PhD students presented their work to the School. We also had two amazing plenary talks from Dr Nick Isaac (CEH) and Professor Jennifer McElwain (UCD). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts from the PhD student presentations. Check out the TCD website for more details!   Rebecca Rolfe [@rolfera]: Identification [&hellip