Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

EGG heads talk ecological genetics in Dublin

EGG heads talk ecological genetics in Dublin

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research, Seminars

Using genetics to understand ecology is fascinating. The data reveal things that often cannot be found by observation alone, such as patterns of cryptic diversity, migration pathways and the source of colonising populations. But life in ecological genetics research is peculiar because we sit on a border between two fairly different fields of science. In an ecological crowd we’re called the ‘genetics person’ while among geneticists we’re seen to have only a rudimentary knowledge of ‘real’ genetics and our comments on ecological theory are sometimes met with funny looks. So spending time in an ecological genetics crowd [&hellip

A recipe for collaboration

A recipe for collaboration

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Research

Recently, along with Adam Kane, Kevin Healy, Graeme Ruxton and Andrew Jackson, we published a review on scavenging behaviour in vertebrates through time in Ecography. This paper was my first review paper as well as my first paper written from afar, without ever actually meeting in a room with the co-authors for working on the project. Difficulty: * Preparation time: 5 month to submission Serves: 5 people (but any manageable number of people who you like working with will do) Ingredients: An exciting topic: For this recipe you will need an exciting topic. In this case, prior [&hellip

Research haikus

Research haikus

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

Last month, the Zoology Department’s Dr. David Kelly launched his first book of Japanese short form poetry, Hammerscale from the Thrush’s Anvil. At the launch of the book, David invited us in the audience to try our hand at writing our own haikus. Taking him up on his challenge, and taking inspiration from his book, a few of us in the School of Natural Sciences have penned our own poems based on our areas of study. We even have a contribution from David Kelly himself! Trying not to sacrifice coherency at the alter of syllable number was [&hellip

Ecology & Science in Ireland: the inaugural meeting of the Irish Ecological Association

Ecology & Science in Ireland: the inaugural meeting of the Irish Ecological Association

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

In the years to come, 140 ecologists working in Ireland will look back with fond memories of being part of the inaugural meeting of the Irish Ecological Association (24th-26th November). We will remember hard-hitting plenaries, compelling oral presentations, data-rich posters, influential workshops and the formation of the IEA’s first committee. The lively social events might be harder for some of us to remember… There could not have been a more fitting way to open the conference than the plenary seminar from Professor Ian Montgomery (QUB) on Thursday night. Within the hour, he managed to given an incredibly [&hellip

Winning research - Zoology storms the Lightening Talks

Winning research – Zoology storms the Lightening Talks

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research, Seminars

Earlier this month, postgraduate students of the Zoology department compete in the fourth annual ‘School of Natural Sciences Lightening Talks’ alongside students and staff from Botany and Geology. We all presented 120 second snapshots of our research and were judged by a panel. Judges included the Head of the School of Natural Sciences Professor Fraser Mitchell, Science Gallery’s Aine Flood and Trinity’s press officer for the Faculty of engineering, mathematics and science, Thomas Deane. Zoology had two winners on the night, Darren O’Connell (@oconned5) for his presentation on ‘Character release in the absence of a congeneric competitor’ and [&hellip

Room for one more?: Egg fostering in seabirds

Room for one more?: Egg fostering in seabirds

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

  When attempting to conserve a rare animal population sometimes every individual counts. Conservationists regularly go the extra mile to protect their study species. The conservation efforts implemented for the Little Tern (Sternula albifrons) in Britain and Ireland demonstrate the success these efforts can have. This species nests on shingle beaches and had experienced catastrophic population declines due to increasing development and use of beaches by people. Little Tern adults are very vulnerable to disturbance and their eggs are particularly vulnerable to walker’s boots! Thankfully a network of wardened colonies, run by a mixture of conservation organisations [&hellip

The Evolution and Laboratory of the Technician.

The Evolution and Laboratory of the Technician.

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

First in a series of posts on life after an undergraduate degree, Alison Boyce gives an account of the life of a scientific technician. Science, engineering, and computing departments in universities employ technicians. Anyone working or studying in these areas will have dealt with a technician at some point but most will be unaware of a technician’s route into the position and their full role in education and research. Technical posts are varied e.g. laboratory, workshop, computer. Funding for technical support is afforded by the Higher Education Authority (HEA) to provide assistance in undergraduate teaching. This is [&hellip

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the “ten hundred” most used words.

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

At today’s NERD club, we tried our hand at explain our research using the up-goer five, which limited our available vocabulary to the “ten-hundred” most common words (thousand isn’t one of them). After some brief hesitation, the 9 of us present found out that despite being quite challenging, this can be an incredibly fun and useful activity when it comes to explaining our often jargon-filled research to the public. While this system is rigid, and a tad extreme with words such as “plant” and “science” unavailable, it forced us to find alternative ways of explaining what we do.   [&hellip

Listening to Evolutionary Oddities @TEDxUCD

Listening to Evolutionary Oddities @TEDxUCD

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Perspectives, Research

Last December I was asked to participate in the TEDxUCD 2015 event. The event included 9 national and international speakers with a wide range of ideas worth spreading. Despite being asked to participate only two days prior to the event luckily I could draw on the wide research area encompassed in my new Post Doc position using the COMPADRE and COMADRE databases to study patterns in demography and life-history evolution in plant and animals. As I couldn’t possible fit all the ideas worth sharing from the fields of demography and life-history evolution into an eleven-minute entertainment talk [&hellip

The world economy in a cube

The world economy in a cube

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

  In 1884, the English theologian and pedagogue Edwin A. Abbott wrote a romance called “Flatland”, in which he described a two dimensional world. The rigid and hierarchically organized society of Flatland develops in the large plane in which it lives, and flat authorities control that no flat citizen (the inhabitants are all flat geometric figures) escapes from the two-dimension reality. The book is a social satire as well as an exploration of the concept of multiple dimensions. Furthermore, it can also be viewed as a critic of narrow worldviews stubbornly based on old paradigms.   The [&hellip