Posts Tagged ‘biodiversity’

Research haikus

Research haikus

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

Last month, the Zoology Department’s Dr. David Kelly launched his first book of Japanese short form poetry, Hammerscale from the Thrush’s Anvil. At the launch of the book, David invited us in the audience to try our hand at writing our own haikus. Taking him up on his challenge, and taking inspiration from his book, a few of us in the School of Natural Sciences have penned our own poems based on our areas of study. We even have a contribution from David Kelly himself! Trying not to sacrifice coherency at the alter of syllable number was [&hellip

Ecology & Science in Ireland: the inaugural meeting of the Irish Ecological Association

Ecology & Science in Ireland: the inaugural meeting of the Irish Ecological Association

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

In the years to come, 140 ecologists working in Ireland will look back with fond memories of being part of the inaugural meeting of the Irish Ecological Association (24th-26th November). We will remember hard-hitting plenaries, compelling oral presentations, data-rich posters, influential workshops and the formation of the IEA’s first committee. The lively social events might be harder for some of us to remember… There could not have been a more fitting way to open the conference than the plenary seminar from Professor Ian Montgomery (QUB) on Thursday night. Within the hour, he managed to given an incredibly [&hellip

Trump and the future of

Trump and the future of “America’s best idea.”

By EcoEvo@TCD | News

In 1872 Yellowstone National Park was established as the first National Park not only in the USA, but in the world. President Ulysses S. Grant signed into law the Yellowstone National Park Protection Act, and so the National Parks were born. Today 59 National Parks exist throughout the United States, covering approximately 51.9 million acres with the goal of maintaining in perpetuity both wildlife and their habitat. Since 1916 the National Park Service (NPS) has been entrusted with the care of these National Parks, and this year they celebrate their centenary. The National Parks have been referred [&hellip

Tropical Field Course Kenya

Tropical Field Course Kenya

By EcoEvo@TCD | News

We’ve just returned from our annual Tropical Ecology Field Course in Kenya with our final year undergraduates. Our trip took us on a journey through the rift valley to the theme of biodiversity, conservation and sustainable livelihoods. Here are some of the sights of the trip:       Author: Deirdre McClean Photo credits: Deirdre McClean and Ian Donohue

The Wakatobi Flowerpecker: the reclassification of a bird species and why it matters

The Wakatobi Flowerpecker: the reclassification of a bird species and why it matters

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Research

I posted previously about my PhD research studying bird populations from the tropical and biodiversity-rich region of Sulawesi, Indonesia. I am happy to announce that the first paper as part of this research has just been published in the open access journal PLOS ONE. To read the full paper for free, click here. This work is a collaborative effort from staff in the Department of Zoology in Trinity College Dublin and Haluoleo University in Sulawesi. Here, I’d like to discuss the wider importance of the findings of this study. My current research focuses on bird populations from [&hellip

Biodiversity face off

Biodiversity face off

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Perspectives

Between the 1st and 2nd of May several members of the Trinity Centre for Biodiversity Research got their game faces on for the inaugural Intervarsity BioBlitz Challenge. For the first time the Trinity fox and co were pitted against the best biodiversity on offer from the DCU, NUI Galway and UCC campuses. The stakes were high but the goal was simple; identify more species on campus then any other college in a 24 hour period and become the first college biodiversity champion of Ireland! Kicking off Trinity’s effort to win the championship the birdwatchers were up bright and [&hellip

Mooching in Madagascar

Mooching in Madagascar

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

I recently returned from a short stint of fieldwork in Madagascar. The purpose of our trip was to run some behavioural tests of echolocation in tenrecs but things didn’t exactly go according to plan. Therefore we had plenty of time to explore and experience some of the wonders of the 8th continent. Here’s a few of our wildlife highlights…  Author and Images: Sive Finlay, sfinlay[at]tcd.ie, @SiveFinlay

Seminar Series: Nathalie Pettorelli, Institute of Zoology, London

Seminar Series: Nathalie Pettorelli, Institute of Zoology, London

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Part of our series of posts by final-year undergraduate students for their Research Comprehension module. Students write blogs inspired by guest lecturers in our Evolutionary Biology and Ecology seminar series in the School of Natural Sciences. This week, views from Sharon Matthews and Sinead Barrett on Nathalie Pettorelli’s seminar, “Monitoring biodiversity from space: a wealth of opportunities”. Space, the final frontier for ecology? Okay, you got me.  I am a trekkie who is fanatical about anything space related. So when I saw that this week’s seminar was to do with conservation biology from space, I was hooked!  Dr. Nathalie Pettorelli [&hellip

Kenya- A Summary through the vegetation

Kenya- A Summary through the vegetation

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

During the first week of November I travelled to Kenya to help out on the Tropical Field Ecology course, run by Ian Donahue in the Zoology Department.  Final year students from Zoology, Environmental Sciences, and Plant Sciences attended, and I was the postgraduate representative from the Botany Department.  While I should under no circumstances be considered a true Botanist-I study plant-animal interactions, and my botanical skills are mediocre at best- I did my best to learn about the amazing tropical flora of this region.  I’m sure others will write about the trip in detail, but I thought [&hellip

I am a nice shark, not a mindless eating machine

I am a nice shark, not a mindless eating machine

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

Shark! Jaws has a lot to answer for. While I doubt there was ever a time that sharks weren’t seen as a threat, that threat was only threatening to sailors and those who chose to traverse the oceans. Then Jaws comes along and suddenly sharks become the enemy to anyone foolhardy enough to set foot in briny water. This isn’t to say that sharks aren’t dangerous. Earlier this year a man was killed by a shark in New Zealand in a vicious attack that left a community stunned. Yet this was a rare event, one of the [&hellip