Posts Tagged ‘public engagement’

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 3/3

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 3/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Aoibheann Gaughran (@Aoibh_G) Supervisor: Nicola Marples Title: How population density influences social mammal ecology: A case study of the European badger.  The local density of a population of social mammals can affect many aspects of its ecology including social structure, mating systems, dispersal behavior, territorial behavior and the dynamics of disease. Scientists and policy-makers need a comprehensive understanding of the local population density as this may dictate the most effective management strategy. The European badger provides a particularly good species to investigate the effects of population density on other density parameters because its density varies by orders of [&hellip

School of Natural Science Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 2/3

School of Natural Science Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 2/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

Aoife Delaney (@Ifa_Dee) Supervisor: Jane Stout Title: Do principals of cross congruence apply in a naturally disturbed habitat? Cross congruence is a measure of the degree to which diversity (number or composition of species) of different taxa follow broadly similar patterns in response to environmental conditions. In situations where cross congruence is strong, measuring the diversity of a single taxon can provide information regarding overall diversity, and this has led to the development of indicator taxa. Indicator taxa may be used to indicate general patterns of biological diversity or environmental conditions, often with the inference that where the environmental conditions are [&hellip

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3

By EcoEvo@TCD | Seminars

School of Natural Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2016: Part 1/3 #zoobotpgsymp, not an infection transmitted by botflies, but the hashtag of the annual Botany-Zoology postgraduate symposium, hosted by the School of Natural Sciences, which took place on the 14th of April. This year’s symposium hosted 15 student speakers over 2 sessions of talks as well as two pleniaries delivered by our guest speakers: Dr Nina Alphey (University of Oxford, Imperial College London) and Dr Rob Thomas (University of Cardiff). For those of you who are interested in exactly what we work on here at EcoEvo@TCD, here are the abstracts [&hellip

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the

The up-goer five: Explaining research using the “ten hundred” most used words.

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Research

At today’s NERD club, we tried our hand at explain our research using the up-goer five, which limited our available vocabulary to the “ten-hundred” most common words (thousand isn’t one of them). After some brief hesitation, the 9 of us present found out that despite being quite challenging, this can be an incredibly fun and useful activity when it comes to explaining our often jargon-filled research to the public. While this system is rigid, and a tad extreme with words such as “plant” and “science” unavailable, it forced us to find alternative ways of explaining what we do.   [&hellip

Spud Oddity: Did The Martian really “science the sh*t out of this”?

Spud Oddity: Did The Martian really “science the sh*t out of this”?

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives, Reviews

It’s rare to come across a sci-fi movie that isn’t loaded with technobabble or scientific terms that are used ever so incorrectly. In fact, a lot of the Hollywood blockbusters are guilty of mincing the scientific words and concepts for entertainment value: “The Day After Tomorrow”, “Armageddon”, “Lucy”, “The Core”, to name but a few. In short, Science itself has been drastically misrepresented by the Hollywood industry. Then along came Ridley Scott’s sci-fi epic “The Martian”. Based on the sci-fi novel by Andy Weir, it tells the story of astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon), who’s left stranded [&hellip

Listening to Evolutionary Oddities @TEDxUCD

Listening to Evolutionary Oddities @TEDxUCD

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Perspectives, Research

Last December I was asked to participate in the TEDxUCD 2015 event. The event included 9 national and international speakers with a wide range of ideas worth spreading. Despite being asked to participate only two days prior to the event luckily I could draw on the wide research area encompassed in my new Post Doc position using the COMPADRE and COMADRE databases to study patterns in demography and life-history evolution in plant and animals. As I couldn’t possible fit all the ideas worth sharing from the fields of demography and life-history evolution into an eleven-minute entertainment talk [&hellip

Blog Roll #1

Blog Roll #1

By EcoEvo@TCD | News, Reviews

Interested in keeping up with developments in the world of Ecology and Evolution? Well then, you’ve come to the right place!   Welcome to BlogRoll, EcoEvo’s fortnightly news and views roundup. Every two weeks, we will present a collections of some of the stories and papers that have caught our eye.   In parasitology, a study which was published in Science has found that women infected with the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides over their lifetime gave birth to two extra children on average, suggesting the worm altered the immune system in such a way as to make it easier to have [&hellip

Swan wrangling in the Pale

Swan wrangling in the Pale

By EcoEvo@TCD | Research

For those of us with an interest in the natural world, Mute Swans (Cygnus olor) are a staple of urban wildlife in Dublin, present in many parks and along both canals. However, it has been 25 years since there has been any real assessment of the state of the Mute Swan population in the Dublin region (1). This has been a period of immense change in the urban landscape. Mute Swan © Graham Prole   This summer, the Irish Midlands Ringing Group (IMRG) started a monitoring project to assess the state of the Mute Swan population in [&hellip

#AnyoneCanCutGrass?

#AnyoneCanCutGrass?

By EcoEvo@TCD | Perspectives

#AnyoneCanCutGrass? That was a recent hashtag in my Twitter timeline and it stirred me on to put this short piece together, so why would it cause me a thought? Well I’m a turfgrass professional, I have been maintaining amenity turfgrass and managing golf course surfaces for 30 years now and like most professions there’s more to it than meets the untrained eye. As I’m writing this the Premiership and Champions League have just re-started, the Curragh races are on down the road, Wimbledon and the RDS Horseshow are over, and the GAA football and hurling are reaching [&hellip

Discover Life - Friday 25th September 2015

Discover Life – Friday 25th September 2015

By EcoEvo@TCD | News

On Friday September 25, the School of Natural Sciences and Trinity Centre for Biodiversity Research will present Discover Life! in the Zoology and Botany buildings at Trinity College Dublin. Come and see how researchers are trying to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems and get a highlight of a large variety of internationally recognized research projects! In the Botany Department ask us about how we are trying to fight biodiversity loss, search for new species and reduce future world hunger. Check out what bees and pond beasties look like up close; find out what happens [&hellip